Concrete Solutions for Combatting Climate Change

During the last week, industry insiders, government officials, lobbyist, and community stakeholders from around the world descended upon Poland for COP24. What remains abundantly clear, combatting climate change is a multi-faceted, complicated problem. However, sacrifices in the short-term must be made to ensure the long-term health of our planet is secured. This is epitomized by the need to transition away from the use cheap cement in infrastructure development and construction projects across the world in favor of some more climate-friendly material. 

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Rural Residents and Commuters are Key to Meeting PEV Goals

Residents outside of densely populated regions of the state are forced to rely on inadequate charging infrastructure. The clustering of charging stations around cities and more populated areas results in large swaths of the state lacking any of this crucial infrastructure. This lack of charging infrastructure becomes even more glaring when identifying areas that have DC Fast-Charging ports available. More most be done if the state is to meet 2030 targets.

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How California Can Meet its Plug-in Vehicle Goals

California has set out ambitious targets for 2020, 2025, and 2030, aiming to have a total of 1 million, 1.5 million, and 5 million PEVs on the road by each year, respectively. At the beginning of 2018, California had roughly 341,000 registered PEVs in total, a number that can be expected to reach 400,000 by the end of 2018. To accomplish its 2030 goal of replacing roughly one-fifth of the current vehicle fleet with PEVs, California will need to register 12 times the current total amount of PEVs on the road, or roughly 380,000 new vehicles annually. 

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No on 6, Yes on EVs

The state aims to have five million PEVs on the road by 2030, drastically lowering its carbon footprint associated with transportation. Consequently, this will help ensure targets set out in SB-100 are achieved (transportation currently accounts for 40 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the state). In this way, the gas tax acts as a promoter of the PEV industry and the obtainment of 100 percent clean energy.

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Saving Solar Manufacturing is a Waste of Energy

In light of a remarkable trend towards renewable energy sources, it is unsurprising that the solar industry now supports 260,000 jobs, which translates to a year-on-year percent increase of 43% since 2011. As solar installers have benefited from the lower costs of imported components and passed these savings on to their customers, the industry's job growth has largely been driven by the resulting increasing demand. This is what makes the new tariff on solar panels stunting to continued growth in US solar markets.

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Maria Blows Away the Old, In with the New?

This year’s hurricane season has put on full display the havoc natural disasters can cause around the world. Every one of these events, from earthquakes to wildfires, have the power to bring entire regions to their knees and, in extreme cases, force devastated communities to rebuild energy infrastructure completely from scratch.

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Trump and Paris - An Unexpected Outcome

Donald Trump's decision to pull out of the Paris agreement was a good thing, for the Paris process. Two concepts from economics and econometrics, the sunk cost fallacy and the counterfactual, can help us understand this counterintuitive impact. When comparing the outcome of the decision with the appropriate counterfactual, which acknowledges that the election of a climate change denier to the most powerful political office in the world is a sunk cost, it is hard to see how the U.S. leaving the Paris process is not a good thing for the process.

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